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Digimodernism : how new technologies dismantle the postmodern and reconfigure our culture /

by Kirby, Alan.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Continuum, 2009Description: vi, 282 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781441175281.Subject(s): Information technology -- Social aspects | Culture -- Philosophy | Postmodernism -- Social aspects | Bilgi teknolojisi -- Sosyal açıdan | Kültür -- Felsefe | Postmodernizm -- Sosyal açıdan
Contents:
Introduction; 1. The Arguable Death of Postmodernism; 2. The Digimodernist Text; 3. A Prehistory of Digimodernism; 4. Digimodernism and Web 2.0; 5. Digimodernist Aesthetics; 6. Digimodernist Culture; 7. Toward a Digimodernist Society?; Conclusion - Endless; Notes; Works Cited.
Summary: Almost without anybody noticing, a new cultural paradigm has come center stage, displacing an exhausted and increasingly marginalised postmodernism. Dr. Alan Kirby calls this cultural paradigm digimodernism, a name comprising both its central technical mode and its privileging of the fingers and thumbs in its use. The increasing irrelevancy of postmodernism requires a new theory to underpin our current digital culture. Beginning with the Internet (digimodernism's most important locus), then taking into account television, cinema, computer games, music, radio, etc., Kirby analyzes the emergence and implications of these diverse media, coloring our cultural landscape with new ideas on texts and how they work. This new kind of text produces distinctive forms of author and reader/viewer, which, in turn, lead to altered notions of authority, 'truth' and legitimation. With users intervening physically in the creation of texts, our electronically-dependent society is becoming more involved in the grand narrative. To clarify these trends, Kirby compares them to the contrasting tendencies of the preceding postmodern era. In defining this new cultural age, the author avoids both facile euphoria and pessimistic fatalism, aiming instead to understand and thereby gain control of a cultural mode which seems, as though from nowhere, to have engulfed our society.
List(s) this item appears in: İngiliz Dili ve Edebiyatı - Yabancı Diller kitapları
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Kitap Kitap Book Cart Non Fiction HM 851 .K57 2009 (Browse shelf) c.1 Available 36635

Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-269) and index.

Introduction; 1. The Arguable Death of Postmodernism; 2. The Digimodernist Text; 3. A Prehistory of Digimodernism; 4. Digimodernism and Web 2.0; 5. Digimodernist Aesthetics; 6. Digimodernist Culture; 7. Toward a Digimodernist Society?; Conclusion - Endless; Notes; Works Cited.

Almost without anybody noticing, a new cultural paradigm has come center stage, displacing an exhausted and increasingly marginalised postmodernism. Dr. Alan Kirby calls this cultural paradigm digimodernism, a name comprising both its central technical mode and its privileging of the fingers and thumbs in its use. The increasing irrelevancy of postmodernism requires a new theory to underpin our current digital culture. Beginning with the Internet (digimodernism's most important locus), then taking into account television, cinema, computer games, music, radio, etc., Kirby analyzes the emergence and implications of these diverse media, coloring our cultural landscape with new ideas on texts and how they work. This new kind of text produces distinctive forms of author and reader/viewer, which, in turn, lead to altered notions of authority, 'truth' and legitimation. With users intervening physically in the creation of texts, our electronically-dependent society is becoming more involved in the grand narrative. To clarify these trends, Kirby compares them to the contrasting tendencies of the preceding postmodern era. In defining this new cultural age, the author avoids both facile euphoria and pessimistic fatalism, aiming instead to understand and thereby gain control of a cultural mode which seems, as though from nowhere, to have engulfed our society.

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